Australia and china relationship history quiz

The dragon and the kangaroo: 45 years of Australia-China relations | SBS News

australia and china relationship history quiz

Australia has a long history of contact with China, but formal relations between the two A selection of records relating to Australia and China is listed below. Key Challenges in the Australia–China Relationship. .. In particular, the paper will focus on three main questions: (1) What are the key . difference between the two countries in terms of history, culture, political systems and values has made. May 7, Australia's establishment of diplomatic relations with China in These reflect our different history, our different political systems, as well as different interests. For example, we don't always see eye-to-eye on questions of.

In March Taiwan held its first fully democratic presidential election. The Chinese Government, in an effort to reassert its continuing claim to sovereignty over Taiwan and to influence Taiwanese electors not to vote for pro-independence candidates, began a demonstrative series of missile tests in the Taiwan Straits.

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In response, the US Government moved two aircraft carrier groups into the area to monitor the tests and to affirm its interest in the security of Taiwan. One of the first foreign policy actions by the new Coalition Government after its election in March was to call in the Chinese Ambassador to express its concern about the mounting tensions between China and Taiwan.

The new Minister for Foreign Affairs, Mr Alexander Downer, also welcomed the US decision to move warships into the Straits as a sign of US commitment to the security of the East Asian region, as 'demonstrating [US] interest in participating in regional security issues in a very practical way'.

Chinese Government representatives did not make any particular public response to the position of the government, but subsequent events suggest that they took note of Australia's quick support for the US and began to look for further signs that policy in Canberra was changing with the new government, in particular that Australia was moving away from its 'one China' policy.

China began to register great sensitivity to Australian dealings with the government in Taipei. In July, the Mayors of Beijing and Shenzhen declined to attend an Asian cities' conference held in Brisbane in protest against the attendance of the Mayor of Taipei, Mr Chen Shui-bian, a leading figure in the pro-independence Democratic Progressive Party.

Mr Downer had issued a statement saying that the federal government had no objection to a visit by Mr Chen. Funded as part of Australia's overseas aid program, the scheme had been controversial for some time and the government decided to abolish it as part of efforts to reduce budget expenditure. The Chinese Ambassador said the move would: We hope that the Australian Government will follow internationally accepted practices and continue to support the projects in the pipeline All these projects have been committed by the two governments.

Australia-China Relationship Overview

If they are not to be carried out, then it won't be in line with international practices. But it has also been suggested that the Chinese were particularly concerned that the cancellation of DIFF funding was part of a wider campaign by Western countries to restrict the flow of development assistance to China.

Australia's cancellation of projects in China financed through soft loans may have strengthened fears in Beijing that Australian foreign policy was taking on a new pro-US and anti-China character. The 'Claws of a Crab'? Part of the foreign policy agenda of the new Coalition Government was to re-emphasise Australia's security relationship with the US. At the AUSMIN talks the two countries signed a new security declaration and agreed to expand the range of joint exercises, including regular participation by US personnel on Australian soil.

Chinese reaction to the development came quickly and stridently, in the form of a commentary in the official People's Daily. From this we can see that the United States is really thinking about using these two 'anchors' as the craws of a crab The recent moves by the US in Australia show that the Cold War thought process has not changed much in the minds of some people, who still hope to play the role of the global policeman.

Whereas the previous Labor Government paid more attention to building bilateral security relations, the new government has repeatedly emphasised the importance of its traditional allies.

Using the metaphors beloved of Chinese commentary, the article compared Australia to a bat which gave its allegiance to the mammals when they triumphed, but showed its wings and declared itself a bird when the birds were victorious.

australia and china relationship history quiz

What countries have seen instead are aid cuts to Asia and speeches by the MP, Pauline Hanson, full of anti-Asian and anti-immigration sentiment. As soon as it was announced that the Buddhist leader and symbol of the Tibetan independence struggle would be visiting Australia, the Chinese Government began protesting against any suggestion that the Dalai Lama would meet the Prime Minister or any senior Australian Government figure.

When the Prime Minister said he would indeed meet the Dalai Lama, the People's Daily launched a particularly strident attack on the Australian government: The statement repeated the warning that the decision would 'unavoidably produce a negative impact on relations between China and Australia'. Nevertheless, senior members of previous Australian governments and parliament had held meetings with the Dalai Lama without the vituperation which marked their reaction to Mr Howard's meeting.

The Chinese have always opposed such meetings but their response on this occasion was at a new level. It is quite unusual for Australian foreign policy to be subject to a repeated critique in the Chinese press. The View from Beijing The change in the character of Chinese statements about Australia needs to be understood as the product of a general perception in Beijing that Australian policy was being redefined under a Coalition Government.

A number of individual actions without a united objective in mind were interpreted by the Chinese authorities as a co-ordinated policy response. The Australian Government did not appear to appreciate the extent to which Beijing would read a single coherent meaning into the actions. The view from Beijing was that Australia under a Coalition Government was becoming less sympathetic to the Chinese position on highly sensitive issues such as Taiwan and Tibet and was moving to re-emphasise traditional especially US relationships at the expense of Asian connections.

Of particular disquiet from Beijing's point of view, Australia's renewed stress on the importance of the US alliance was seen as a return to a less independent foreign policy which would conform more closely to US interests.

This was regarded with particular concern at a time when China-US relations were being affected by a number of disagreements. Dealing with an Emerging Great Power Following the efforts of senior Australian Government officials and the meeting between the Australian Prime Minister and Chinese President in Manila in Novemberthe government of China brought an end to the hostile public critique of Australian policy.

A Chinese presidential spokesman was reported as describing the Howard-Ziang meeting as 'very friendly': One meeting cannot resolve all the problems, but the two leaders have reached a common understanding to overcome our difficulties and keep better relations in the future.

This is the beginning of another stage; that we should keep the momentum going. His comments indicate that the Chinese Government has a generally positive attitude towards the prospects for Sino-Australian relations. Politically and militarily, China and Australia pose no threat to each other. Economically, the two countries complement each other.

Australia–China relations

Furthermore, there are many opportunities for Australia and China to cooperate with each other in international and particularly regional issues. He said the difficulties in were due to the Australian government taking 'some actions which ended up hurting the national feelings of the Chinese people'.

As long as the two countries respect each other's sovereignty and territorial integrity, bilateral relations will continue to develop and the potential for cooperation between the two sides will be enhanced. Although Australia's relations with China have undergone a qualitative change during the last decade and are no longer framed in predominantly geopolitical terms, the Chinese leadership still conducts all its international affairs with broader regional and global implications in mind.

Containment, Engagement and Australia-China Relations Chinese perceptions of how it is regarded in international affairs are still strongly influenced by suspicions that the US and to some extent Japan and other Western powers harbour a desire to prevent China from taking its place amongst the major players on the world stage. Chinese officials look back on a history in which China saw itself as the 'Middle Kingdom' to which the rest of the world paid tribute, followed by a hundred years of humiliation and incursions into its sovereignty by foreigners.

When the Chinese people 'stood up', as Mao put it inand embarked on a new effort to rebuild their country, the US instituted a policy of 'containment' which the Chinese Government considered was an attempt to keep China weak and isolated. These crucial underlying factors in China's relations with the countries of the West became especially evident in the discord which affected US relations with China beginning from Relations deteriorated over a number of issues: US actions over Taiwan and strategic issues began to be read as signs of a return to the policies of 'containment'.

Beijing feared that while professing to seek 'constructive engagement' with China, the US actually wanted to contain the rise of a rival superpower. Australia is seen as a faithful long-term ally of the US which supported the US during the Vietnam War and the Cold War and emulated the US policy of recognising the Taiwan regime as the legitimate government of China.

At the same time, Australia is appreciated for its capacity to act independently of the US, including trading with China during the s and s and recognising the PRC insix years before the US. During the s, Australia's close relationship with China also played a small role in facilitating China's economic and political opening to the world in the post-Maoist era.

Australia also expressed its disagreement with US efforts, in andto link China's MFN status with the issue of human rights.

Nevertheless, the Chinese authorities remain highly sensitive to any perceived changes in Australia's strategic and economic outlook and are especially wary of any moves to return to what could be seen as a slavish emulation of the US. While Australia and China have, since the s, developed a strong bilateral relationship based on shared interests, China still handles its affairs with individual countries in the context of global strategic relationships. As Australia's bilateral and regional involvement with China grows in the future, a key challenge for Australia's policy-makers will be to balance the demands of the relationship with China while maintaining close strategic and economic ties with the US.

One of the central dilemmas for both Australia and the US will continue to be the question of Taiwan. China under the current regime would never accept a formally independent Taiwan, but Taiwan has been effectively independent for many years and is becoming an increasingly important economic player in the region, lobbying with growing effectiveness for a more regularised status in the international community.

The contrast of Taiwan's transition to democratic rule with the authoritarianism and suppression of human rights in China has been instrumental in winning Taipei many supporters in the US, particularly in Congress. Any change in policy on Taiwan in either Washington or Canberra would jeopardise the even more important relationship with Beijing, yet the pressures on the current ambiguous arrangements can only grow in the future.

australia and china relationship history quiz

The issue of Hong Kong is not fraught with the complexities of Taiwan's status, but the territory's reunification with China in July has many potential problems, not only in terms of their implications for US-China relations but because of Australia's direct bilateral interests. Hong Kong is a very important trading partner for Australia whose economic future is of great interest for Australia, and Australia will be unable to stand aloof from the tensions which may develop over the issue of political freedom and human rights in the territory under Chinese rule.

Economic Growth and Political Uncertainty The growing importance of relations with China for Australian policy-makers is set to continue because China is maintaining rapid economic growth even while entering a period of political uncertainty.

International attention has focused even more on this uncertainty since the death of Deng Xiaoping. The Chinese economy has sustained an average annual growth rate of almost ten per cent over the last decade and is projected to become the world's second largest economy within the next ten years.

China's growth, together with Australia's greater relative economic involvement in the Asia-Pacific region, have led to a twenty per cent average annual increase in Australia's exports to China over the last five years.

China is currently Australia's fifth largest trading partner and if the trade figures with Hong Kong were to be added after reunification in Julythe total would rank third after Japan and the US. Chinese investment in Australian agriculture and minerals has expanded considerably in recent years. China's economic success has boosted the confidence with which the Chinese Government is conducting its foreign relations and asserting its position in regional territorial disputes such as the Spratly Islands, 28 in its relations with powers such as the US and Japan and over issues such as human rights.

While China's military capability is limited and its armed forces are only at the beginning of what will be a long process of modernisation, the country's rapid economic development provides the necessary conditions for its eventual rise to the status of a major military power. The effective debunking of Maoist ideology following the rise to power of Deng Xiaoping has meant that the legitimacy of the Chinese Communist Party has come to rely on its capacity to deliver access to material wealth.

But the benefits of the new approach have not flowed evenly to the Chinese people. In contrast with the shared backwardness of Maoist China, regional disparities are widening as well-situated provinces take advantage of new opportunities while poorer regions experience far less growth. The rise of market-driven economics has uprooted millions of people in search of work and thrown the future of millions of workers in old state-owned industries into doubt.

With rising visible poverty and crime, many Chinese perceive that the benefits of economic growth are being monopolised by a corrupt minority. The suppression of the pro-democracy movement in Junewhich arose partly to protest against such problems, further weakened the legitimacy of the Communists and has led them to depend increasingly on the power of the armed forces. The Party continues to shrink from any ideas of political liberalisation for fear of the complete loss of control which brought about the collapse of the Soviet Union.

australia and china relationship history quiz

Meanwhile the continuous growth of the privately-owned economy and of foreign trade is steadily diminishing Beijing's control over the functioning of the economy and its capacity to exercise power over the daily lives of the Chinese people. Although Deng held no formal office fromhe was still a figure of immense authority until his death on 19 February His passing may exacerbate internal tensions and contest for power within the Party leadership.

His death will, at the very least, throw popular attention back onto the issue of the role of the Party. It was the spreading of a factional dispute within the Party into the streets in early which provided a catalyst for the mass movement which culminated in the events around Tiananmen Square in June While Deng's death is unlikely to provoke an immediate crisis, the future course of the process of political change in China could profoundly affect the character of Chinese foreign policy.

With the loss of Maoist ideology, the Party leadership has already increasingly emphasised its role as the defender of Chinese nationalism. As Michael Yahuda has argued, trends towards aggressive nationalism in foreign relations could be heightened if there is division or uncertainty during the process of succession: The less disruptive [the succession] may be, the more likely it is that a self-confident leadership will emerge that would be able to pursue China's sovereignty claims with moderation The more difficult the succession the more likely that a weak leadership would respond erratically and assertively to perceived challenges, especially if it were dependent upon the armed forces who are imbued with more virulent nationalist sentiments.

China is rapidly integrating into the world economy, but the state structures which made integration possible are slow to reform and adapt to the new Chinese society that economic change is creating. The Chinese Government understandably expects that the country's emerging status as a leading world economy should be given due recognition in global institutions and affairs, but some parts of the international community still consider that China does not conform fully to the established norms of international relations.

For its part, the Chinese Government, mindful of the fear and suspicion with which it is regarded in some quarters in the US, tends to interpret any pressure to reform its institutions and politics as a new form of anti-Chinese containment. Moreover, any policy or action by a foreign power which suggests a questioning of Chinese sovereignty over Tibet, Hong Kong or Taiwan is regarded as an act hostile to the interests of the entire Chinese nation.

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These issues are fundamental to the background against which Australia must conduct its relations with China. As a key element in Australia's economic and strategic environment, China will occupy an increasingly central part of discussion about Australia's foreign relations in the future. The experience of the last year of Australia-China relations was an excellent indicator of the kind of issues which must be dealt with in order to maintain a stable relationship.

The issues of the status of Taiwan and Australia's dealings with the Taipei government, human rights and the treatment of the Tibetan people, the conduct of aid and economic relations, and Australia's alliance with the US are all matters of great sensitivity for Australia-China relations. Individually, they have generally been managed without major incident and the relationship between Canberra and Taipei is tacitly accepted in Beijing.

The actions of the Chinese Government last year, however, indicated that if the Chinese authorities perceive any movement in Australian policy which they interpret as inimical to Chinese interests, they will not hesitate to call existing arrangements into question. In particular, given the complexities of the Chinese relationship with the US and Beijing's sensitivity about the West's acceptance of China as a world power, Australia's relations with China will be crucially affected by the outcome of efforts to manage the problems in US-China relations during the second Clinton administration.

Having reaffirmed the importance of the US-Australia alliance, a major challenge for the Australian Government will be to avoid misunderstanding in Beijing about the nature of Australia's dealings with the US. Endnotes Canberra Times, 27 Novemberp. Edmund Fung, 'Australia and China', in P. Angel, Diplomacy in the Marketplace: Australia in World Affairs, Melbourne,pp.

Colin Mackerras, 'China', in R. Financial Review, 13 Marchp. Financial Review, 11 July Age, 17 Augustp. Financial Review, 17 Mayp. Various Chinese officials visited Australia. As a mark of respect, he was given a seat on the floor of the House of Representatives. Frederic Egglestonwho previously headed the Commonwealth Grants Commissionwas appointed the first minister to China in ChongqingChina's war-time capital, while Hsu Modeputy foreign minister, was appointed the first minister to Australia.

The United Kingdom proposed in that Britain, Australia and New Zealand should simultaneously recognise the new government.

However, the Australian and New Zealand governments were concerned about electoral repercussions at a time when Communism was becoming a more topical issues, and did not do so immediately. Although Ben Chifley 's Labor government preferred to be realistic about the new Chinese government and would have supported its admission to the United Nations, [6] it lost the election.

The British government went ahead with the recognition of the PRC alone inbut the United States withheld recognition. However, fromAustralia refused to accept ambassadors from the ROC,[ citation needed ] and for many years Australia did not send an ambassador to Taiwan. From as early asthe Australian government's Department of External Affairs was recommending the recognition of the PRC, but this advice was not politically accepted.

While the Labor Party 's official policy from was that Australia should follow the examples of Britain and France in recognising the PRC, on the basis that the ROC was unlikely to recover the mainland, [7] the Liberal Party-led Coalition played up the perceived threat of a Communist China for electoral advantage, including the support of the anti-Communist Democratic Labor Party. As part of this political strategy, Australian Prime Minister Harold Holt explicitly recognised the continuing legitimacy of the ROC government in Taiwan inby sending an ambassador to Taipei for the first time.

As opposition leader, Gough Whitlam visited China in before Henry Kissinger 's historic visit on behalf of the United Statesand in Decemberafter Whitlam's victory in that year's federal election, Australia established diplomatic relations with the People's Republic of China, and Australia ceased to recognise the Republic of China government of Chiang Kai-shek in Taiwan. The establishment of relations with "Red China" roused great excitement in Australia. Since the Chinese economic reforms initiated by the late Deng XiaopingChina has benefited from significant investment in China by Australian companies for example, future Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull had set up the first Sino-foreign joint venture mining company in China inwhile Australia has benefited from the Chinese appetite for natural resources to modernise its economy, infrastructure and meet its growing energy demands.

Australia subsequently won and Sydney hosted the Olympics.

australia and china relationship history quiz

Eight years later, China hosted the Beijing Olympics in Australia is one of the few countries in the world during the global financial crisis that was not in recession. Its continued economic growth due to that period is partly attributed to large demand and long term strong fundamentals from China.

The national security department of China accused the Australia intelligence agency of trying to collect information from overseas Chinese, and even encouraging them to subvert Chinese government. Although Hong Kong, as a special administrative area of China, cannot conduct its own foreign affairs, consular and economic representations exist.

Australia—Taiwan relations While Australia no longer recognises the Republic of China as the legitimate government of China or Taiwanunofficial relations are maintained between Australia and Taiwan. The Taiwan government operates the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Australia, which fulfills most of the functions of an embassy and consulates at an unofficial level. Chinese Australian Australia has been a haven for Chinese migrants for centuries who have, in the modern day, established themselves as a significant minority group in Australian society.

His daughter is married to a Chinese man, and Mr. Rudd also speaks fluent Mandarin. William Mayers studied in China fromand was involved in negotiations to bring the first railway and steam engine to China. It was the most popular destination for Australian students undertaking short-term studies overseas, the seventh most popular destination for long-term studies, and also the seventh most popular destination for practical placements.

The numbers were small initially: Inabout Chinese students entered Australia to study.