Ocean and atmosphere relationship quizzes

Relationship Between Atmosphere and Climate Change Quiz

ocean and atmosphere relationship quizzes

water constantly cycles through the Earth and its atmosphere. This module discusses the hydrologic cycle, including the various water reservoirs in the oceans. The oceans influence climate over long and short time-scales. On the The oceans and the atmosphere are tightly linked and together form the most dynamic. Kids learn about ocean waves and currents including what causes them, how they impact the Ocean waves are caused by wind moving across the surface of the water. Take a ten question quiz about this page. Atmosphere and Weather.

The Hydrologic Cycle: Water's journey through time

In science, a wave is defined as a transfer of energy. Ocean waves are called mechanical waves because they travel through a medium. The medium in this case is water. The water doesn't actually travel with the wave, but only moves up and down.

The Hydrologic Cycle | Earth Science | Quiz | Visionlearning

It's the energy that travels with the wave. You can go here to learn more about the science of waves. Swells are rolling waves that travel long distances through the ocean. They are not generated by the local wind, but by distant storms. Swells are typically smooth waves, not choppy like wind waves. A swell is measured from the crest top to the trough bottom.

Ocean Currents An ocean current is a continuous flow of water in the ocean. Some currents are surface currents while other currents are much deeper flowing hundreds of feet below the surface of the water.

ocean and atmosphere relationship quizzes

What causes ocean currents? Surface currents are usually caused by the wind. As the wind changes, the current may change as well.

Relationship Between Atmosphere and Climate Change Quiz

Currents are also influenced by the rotation of the Earth called the Coriolis effect. This causes currents to flow clockwise in the northern hemisphere and counter clockwise in the southern hemisphere.

Deep ocean currents are caused by a number of things including changes in the temperature, salinity how salty the water isand density of the water. One other factor impacting ocean currents is the gravitational pull of the Moon and the Sun.

Early Atmosphere and Oceans ( Assessments ) | Earth Science | CK Foundation

World distribution of mean sea-level pressure in millibars for January and primary and secondary storm tracks; the general character of the global winds is also shown. Naval Weather Service Command World distribution of mean sea-level pressure in millibars for July and primary and secondary storm tracks; the general character of the global winds is also shown. Naval Weather Service Command A closer examination of the diagrams above reveals some interesting features.

First, it is clear that sea-level pressure is dominated by closed high- and low-pressure centres, which are largely caused by differential surface heating between low and high latitudes and between continental and oceanic regions.

High pressure tends to be amplified over the colder surface features.

  • Atmosphere and Ocean
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Second, because of seasonal changes in surface heating, the pressure centres exhibit seasonal changes in their characteristics. For example, the Siberian HighAleutian Low, and Icelandic Low that are so prominent in the winter virtually disappear in summer as the continental regions warm relative to surrounding bodies of water. At the same time, the Pacific and Atlantic highs amplify and migrate northward.

ocean and atmosphere relationship quizzes

This more symmetrical appearance reflects the dominant role of meridional north-south differences in radiative heating and cooling. Excess heating in tropical latitudes, in contrast to polar areas, produces higher pressure at upper levels in the tropics as thunderstorms transfer air to higher levels. Perfect symmetry between the tropics and the poles is interrupted by wavelike atmospheric disturbances associated with migratory and semipermanent high- and low-pressure surface weather systems.

NASA - The Ocean: A Driving Force for Weather and Climate